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  #1  
Old 07-28-2010, 01:58 PM
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Nakamichi ZX-9, for sale

Hi all,

See link below

http://cgi.ebay.de/Nakamichi-ZX-9-Hi...item3caf7d459b
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  #2  
Old 07-28-2010, 02:10 PM
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Looks like a nice condition deck, though I'd wonder if it needs any mechanical work or not. Price is a bit steep for myself, though Im sure some could afford it.
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  #3  
Old 07-29-2010, 07:10 PM
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That's certainly too steep for the US market. Maybe in Europe that is the going rate?
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  #4  
Old 07-30-2010, 02:00 AM
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Most Dragons are offered for the same amount here.
I don't follow if they sell for that much though.
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  #5  
Old 07-30-2010, 06:56 AM
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Listing states it is coming from an audio store and has been thoroughly inspected, serviced and cleaned. Guaranted to function 100% as it should.

Hefty price, for sure.... Beautiful deck! There must be some reason that some Nak lovers prefer these over Dragons? Has anyone ever done a side-by-side comparo with two good examples of these?
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  #6  
Old 07-30-2010, 07:02 AM
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Hi all,

Yeah all the reviews say that the ZX-9 is as good as if not better than both the CR-7 and Dragon.
Was tempted by this, but just bought a very good CR-7,plus i think direct drive is way better than the older belt drive of the ZX-9
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  #7  
Old 07-30-2010, 12:01 PM
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The ZX-9 is direct drive, with a slave belt to the supply capstan, like the CR-7. Actually, the motor design is a non crystal locked design more similar to one side of a Dragon, than a CR. The ZX-7 is identical to the ZX-9, but is a classic belt drive transport, as it came out before the ZX-9. The boards and design of the electronics between the ZX-7 and 9 are identical. The ZX-9 is often the prefered recording deck over the Dragon, because of the variable recording head azimuth system, that allows the the record ahead and actual tape azimuth to be matched for maximum HF content. The Dragon has the same record head, but fixed, like most decks, as well as the "keys to the kingdom", the ability to fine tune the sensitivity and bias level to get what ever you want out of the tape. The prefered playback deck is the Dragon because of the NAAC. For the fastest, easiest, foolproof recording, the CR-7 is superior, and still has manual playback azimuth adjust, so it sort of gives you the best of both worlds.
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  #8  
Old 07-30-2010, 02:17 PM
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I have 2 Dragons one 86 and one 89, 1 CR-7A 89, and one ZX-9 83, all overhaul by ESL. To me no.1 is the Dragon, ZX-9 is nice, and CR-7A is great. I elaborate more, the CR-7A is calibrated to the SSMM and sounds awesome, the ZX-9 in between SSMM and MA-XG, sounds close to the CR-7A, and the Dragon Records and Play outstanding one calibrated to TDK MA-XG and the other to the Vertex. Hands down the Dragons are the king.
Angel
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  #9  
Old 07-30-2010, 03:46 PM
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Angel

What are the serials numbers on your Dragons?

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  #10  
Old 07-30-2010, 06:55 PM
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I let you guys know, I'm away till next week. These Dragons are up to date and are working superb, and yes they record amazing, nothing to envid a ZX-9. Again only with the tapes calibrated to.
Angel
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  #11  
Old 07-31-2010, 01:08 AM
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The ZX9, Dragon and CR7 are all great decks. Which one is best is probably mostly a matter of preference, but I think it's safe to say that the Dragon has the best transport, and the CR7 is the easiest to make good recordings with. The ZX9 is more similar to the Dragon in most respects except for it's record head which has adjustable azimuth .

The full specs are available at naks.com but in case anyone hasn't seen these, here are the write ups for these decks.


Nakamichi ZX-9
Discrete Head Cassette Deck
Nakamichi ZX-9
Designed for the advanced cassette enthusiast, permitting him to realize the full performance potential of each tape used. Minimum wow/flutter with a superb DD transport.

* MSRP $1550
* 1982-1985
* a125

Left channel bias, right channel bias, left channel record/playback level, right channel record/playback level, and record head azimuth. All these parameters can be precisely calibrated to utilize the full performance potential of each tape used. These calibration controls are geared strictly to optimizing reproduction performance not to mere "tweaking" as in some decks. Another important feature of the ZX-9 is that it is Nakamichi's first direct drive model. A specially developed Super Linear Torque DD motor obviates the problems of conventional direct drive systems while achieving an almost incredible 0.022% wow and flutter figure, and a microcomputer controlled real time mechanism control system provides exceptional operational smoothness and stability.

* Microprocessor Control
* •Double Capstan
* •Direct Drive
* •Silent Mechanism
* •Pressure pad lifter
* •Discrete 3-Head Technology
* •Diffused-Resonance Transport
* •Asymmetrical Dual Capstans



Nakamichi Dragon
Auto Reverse Cassette Deck
Nakamichi Dragon
The ultimate innovation in cassette technology precise, fully automatic playback head azimuth adjustment. Optimum reproduction quality in both forward and reverse playback modes.

* MSRP $2499
* 1982-1993
* a801

Proper azimuth alignment is one of the most important factors in achieving the best possible cassette reproduction quality. For this reason, several Nakamichi cassette decks offer either automatic or manual adjustment of record head azimuth. Ideally, however, playback head azimuth should be adjustable so that even tapes recorded on other decks will be reproduced with the recorded frequency response and sound quality fully intact. Commercially available music tape, tapes borrowed from a friend, tapes in which the shell has warped slightly (a common occurrence) all actually require some degree of playback head azimuth alignment to provide the best possible reproduction quality. Further, inaccuracies in cassette shell symmetry result in completely different azimuth alignment requirements in forward and reverse on auto reverse decks, often causing a significant variation in sound quality. All these points and problems led Nakamichi to the development of the world's first fully automatic playback head azimuth alignment system NAAC (Nakamichi Auto Azimuth Correction) and its incorporation in the world's first dual capstan, double direct drive, auto playback reverse, discrete 3 head cassette deck: the Nakamichi DRAGON. In a slightly different genre than the ultimately luxurious 1000ZXL, the DRAGON is undoubtedly the finest cassette deck available. The DRAGON's unique double direct drive system employs two Nakamichi quartz PLL servo Super Linear Torque DD motors one for each capstan so that wow & flutter are essentially eliminated while maintaining perfect transport stability in both forward and reverse directions. Auto reverse operation has been made available only in the playback mode so that the superb performance of the Discrete Three Head system is not compromised. Of course, full provision is made for left and right channel bias and record/playback level adjustment. All the DRAGON's performance features also mean that the built in Dolby C type noise reduction system operates under ideal conditions for the best performance. The DRAGON represents the culmination of Nakamichi's vast technical resources and experience, and the basic uncompromising Nakamichi standards of performance remain unchanged. Heads, mechanism and amplifiers are all the best available, and many features like the microcomputer controlled real time mechanism control system have been proven in other Nakamichi decks like the superb ZX 9 Discrete Head Cassette Deck. Convenience features include Auto Rec Pause, where the deck automatically enters the Pause mode during recording if a blank interval of 30 seconds or longer is detected in the source, switchable MPX and subsonic filters, easy cueing, and a dual speed auto fader function, for customized recording with professional fade in/fade out results.

* Pressure pad lifter
* •NAAC (Nakamichi Auto Azimuth Correction)
* •Microprocessor Control
* •Double Capstan
* •Direct Drive
* •Silent Mechanism
* •Discrete 3-Head Technology
* •Diffused-Resonance Transport
* •Asymmetrical Dual Capstans



Nakamichi CR-7
Discrete Head Cassette Deck
Nakamichi CR-7
The Deck That Squeezes The Last Ounce Of Performance From Every Tape.

* CR-70/CR-7A/CR-7E
* MSRP $1849
* 1986-1993
* a130

Every tape has a unique "character". It requires just the right amount of bias and the ideal record level to precisely capture the source signal during recording, and playback azimuth must be precisely aligned to accurately read the recorded signal from the tape. The CR-7 adds optimum record and playback calibration to basically superior Nakamichi performance in the easiest way possible: one touch Auto calibration and Azimuth Tuning. Azimuth can even be precisely adjusted from a remote location. The CR-7 makes the most of every tape during both recording and playback.

* Playback Azimuth Fine Tuning
* •Microprocessor Control
* •Auto Calibration
* •Pressure pad lifter
* •Double Capstan
* •Direct Drive
* •Discrete 3-Head Technology
* •Asymmetrical Dual Capstans
* •Diffused-Resonance Transport
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  #12  
Old 07-31-2010, 04:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaeTee View Post
Listing states it is coming from an audio store and has been thoroughly inspected, serviced and cleaned. Guaranted to function 100% as it should.

Hefty price, for sure.... Beautiful deck! There must be some reason that some Nak lovers prefer these over Dragons? Has anyone ever done a side-by-side comparo with two good examples of these?
I have a Dragon, ZX-9, and CR-7A all working at spec or better. I can certainly live with any one of these.

For me, if I am forced to judge them, I have to say:

Dragon for playback. ZX-9 for recording only because of the rec head azimuth (pb head azimuth must be set correctly to enjoy this advantage). I love the look of CR-7A and is a great deck too.

I also have a 1000ZXL. It records great but the w/f is not as good as the direct drive decks.
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  #13  
Old 07-31-2010, 06:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzgene View Post
I have a Dragon, ZX-9, and CR-7A all working at spec or better. I can certainly live with any one of these.

For me, if I am forced to judge them, I have to say:

Dragon for playback. ZX-9 for recording only because of the rec head azimuth (pb head azimuth must be set correctly to enjoy this advantage). I love the look of CR-7A and is a great deck too.

I also have a 1000ZXL. It records great but the w/f is not as good as the direct drive decks.
jazzgene, in your opinion what is the advantage of adjustable azimuth on the record head of the ZX9.
It seems a little strange that Nakamichi would drop this feature on the Dragon if there was any real benefit. I'm not saying there isn't, but I have to confess that I'm not sure what the advantage is.
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  #14  
Old 07-31-2010, 07:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike F View Post
jazzgene, in your opinion what is the advantage of adjustable azimuth on the record head of the ZX9.
It seems a little strange that Nakamichi would drop this feature on the Dragon if there was any real benefit. I'm not saying there isn't, but I have to confess that I'm not sure what the advantage is.
The advantage is you are correcting the azimuth errors introduced by the cassette tape itself to the PB head. This allows you to make recordings that will sound great on any other deck that matches the PB azimuth as the recording deck (which should be the case if you use the same azimuth test tape). This can not be achieved the other way around. With a rec head that is fixed, the errors in the cassette shell remains in the recording. To achieve optimal playback, you will need to adjust the PB head azimuth.
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Old 07-31-2010, 08:31 AM
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Just been reading the manual for the CR-7.
Auto Calibration does the following-
1) Azimuth Calibration is Performed-perfect head alignment.
2) Bias Calibration is Performed
3) Level Calibration is Performed
All of the above run for TWO cycles, then the Deck goes to Paus Record Mode
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  #16  
Old 07-31-2010, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LesX55 View Post
Just been reading the manual for the CR-7.
Auto Calibration does the following-
1) Azimuth Calibration is Performed-perfect head alignment.
2) Bias Calibration is Performed
3) Level Calibration is Performed
All of the above run for TWO cycles, then the Deck goes to Paus Record Mode
Just want to add that on the CR-7, like the Dragon, it adjusts the PB head to correct azimuth error. I prefer adjusting the rec head to correct azimuth error as not all the great decks have PB azimuth adjustment control.
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  #17  
Old 07-31-2010, 08:50 AM
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Thanks for the reply jazzgene and I'm sorry about this but I still don't understand the advantage, and I'm guessing there probably is one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzgene View Post
The advantage is you are correcting the azimuth errors introduced by the cassette tape itself to the PB head.
Do you mean the record head?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzgene View Post
This allows you to make recordings that will sound great on any other deck that matches the PB azimuth as the recording deck (which should be the case if you use the same azimuth test tape).
Wouldn't this be the case anyway?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzgene View Post
This can not be achieved the other way around. With a rec head that is fixed, the errors in the cassette shell remains in the recording. To achieve optimal playback, you will need to adjust the PB head azimuth.
Which is in fact achieved on a deck with PB azimuth adjustment. I understand this could be an advantage but only if you intend to play back your tapes on lesser decks. Some advantage though I suppose.
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  #18  
Old 07-31-2010, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike F View Post
Thanks for the reply jazzgene and I'm sorry about this but I still don't understand the advantage, and I'm guessing there probably is one.



Do you mean the record head?



Wouldn't this be the case anyway?



Which is in fact achieved on a deck with PB azimuth adjustment. I understand this could be an advantage but only if you intend to play back your tapes on lesser decks. Some advantage though I suppose.
A lesser deck may or may not have PB azimuth adjust. And not all great decks have PB azimuth adjust. The 1000ZXL for instance. If you record your tapes with the CR-7 or a Dragon and then play it back on a 1000ZXL, the azimuth errors brought on by the cassette shell will remain. I can tell you from experience that current production cassettes that have the same azimuth from side a to b is almost nil.

If on the other hand, all your decks have PB azimuth adjust or you only use 1 deck, then you are cool.
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Old 07-31-2010, 10:57 AM
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Ahhhh, i think i get it.

On my CR-7, the azimuth adjust works only on the playback head, this is not sooo clear in the manual.
As it reads in the Calibration section, it is very easy to assume they are talking about the record head, as you are calibrating to record.

Thanks for some clarity
Les
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  #20  
Old 07-31-2010, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzgene View Post
A lesser deck may or may not have PB azimuth adjust. And not all great decks have PB azimuth adjust. The 1000ZXL for instance. If you record your tapes with the CR-7 or a Dragon and then play it back on a 1000ZXL, the azimuth errors brought on by the cassette shell will remain. I can tell you from experience that current production cassettes that have the same azimuth from side a to b is almost nil.

If on the other hand, all your decks have PB azimuth adjust or you only use 1 deck, then you are cool.
Thanks for the explanation jazzgene. Yes, I understand the potential advantage if you're going to play your tapes back on another machine without PB azimuth adjustment, OTOH I can see why Nakamichi discontinued the feature..........
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