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Old 05-29-2012, 09:42 AM
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took a cd to the buffing wheel

yep... walked right up to the craftsman pedestal grinder with the buffing wheel on it. guess what? it buffed out a deep scratch! yeah, i was shocked!

i figured i dont have much to lose as the cd is already trashed. i just tried it on 2 other deeply scratched discs and it worked on those as well.

*update*
dont let the cd get caught by the buffing wheel. DOH!
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Last edited by ke4mcl; 05-29-2012 at 10:15 AM.
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Old 05-29-2012, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ke4mcl View Post
yep... walked right up to the craftsman pedestal grinder with the buffing wheel on it. guess what? it buffed out a deep scratch! yeah, i was shocked!
Y'know...you're just not doing it right unless you can somehow involve peanut butter!

Yes, that page is intended to be funny. I had a lot of fun writing it. Now I'd probably better .
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:02 AM
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Cool,glad you did this experiment,I've been thinking of a similiar-ish type of try,involving a 3M Headlight Lens Restoration System and turntable dust covers.I seen this product at a NAPA store,cost about $30 for the buffing pad.Hook this up with a power drill,and would try it on scratched up badly dustcovers,or possible CD's.You would have to make a holder for CD's,but it is re-useable,so...what the heck,need to give it a try. Rob
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:33 AM
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Headlights are made of polycarbonate, whereas dust covers are usually injection-molded styrene. Styrene won't take as much heat as polycarb without deforming, and it's a lot more prone to cracking. Proceed with caution.

I've hand-polished a CD before, and it was tedious.
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:35 AM
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worked great on the deeply scratched cds. the last one though got sucked into the buffing wheel and by the time i realized what happened it was shrapnel all over the shop floor.
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Old 05-29-2012, 11:52 AM
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They make very inexpensive disk polishing gizmos ya know;
hand crank and motorized ones.
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Old 05-29-2012, 12:39 PM
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My son was a professional cd and dvd buffer at a used record store.
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Old 05-29-2012, 05:20 PM
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Warped Bezel Warped Bezel is offline
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My copy of Madonna's Like A Prayer TICKS at a certain rate on the opening cut, which I think is something altogether different.
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Old 05-29-2012, 06:10 PM
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My copy of Madonna's Like A Prayer TICKS at a certain rate on the opening cut, which I think is something altogether different.
dont travel with that cd, TSA may give you a hard time.
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Old 05-29-2012, 07:50 PM
Nick Sunn Nick Sunn is offline
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You should make an EXACT clone of the CD using Roxio/Sonic Easy Cd Creator program on your laptop, or whatever instant clone copy thingamijib program that came on your laptop, or use Windows or whatever else you like...........just make certain the details/specs allow for the Highest Quality, and thus an EXACT CLONE.....................it makes no difference what brand of Computer(data) CDR's that you use.
A friend liked using those patented Verbatim CDR's that looked like a vinyl 45 rpm record on the side that is usually written on. She loved them so much, because she thought they were cute and came in colors like purple, green which was sort of like the Apple green apple color of '68-'75 Beatles releases, and a golden orange color that was almost the same color as the colored vinyl on Grand Funk's Were An American Band 45 from Capitol in 1973. Those Verbatim CDR's functioned every bit as good as plain CDR's. I don't know if they are still made. She bought about a hundred of them when they were on sale about six or seven years ago. They look neat but because they look like a 45 the area surface that you can write on is rather small, but other than that....... .......they do stand out from ordinary looking CDR's with normal Sharpie writing on the face of them....but lets face it a functional CDR or CD is the same quality.
She even went so far to use the vinyl look Verbatim cdr's for promo-giveaway discs of her own demos & live samples, and you'd never use known to be crummy media for that purpose. They worked fine and sounded as good as anything. Perhaps they may have issues in 1984/1985 junky cd players but they worked in a 1985 Sony and everything else she tested them with.

Make CLONES before your only disc gets SCRATCHED/CHIPPED so that it won't play, no matter how much you polish it. With Cd, .. Who cares if it is the original A&M or Capitol CD that is functional....if the Walgreens CDR clone functions, just insert it in the factory cd jewel case and toss the ruined/scratched A&M, Capitol, etc factory disc into the trash where it belongs....
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Old 05-30-2012, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Sunn View Post

Make CLONES before your only disc gets SCRATCHED/CHIPPED so that it won't play, no matter how much you polish it. With Cd, .. Who cares if it is the original A&M or Capitol CD that is functional....if the Walgreens CDR clone functions, just insert it in the factory cd jewel case and toss the ruined/scratched A&M, Capitol, etc factory disc into the trash where it belongs....
Or
Make a clone and play it, keeping the original clean and perfect in case the clone gets scratched

Thomas
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Old 05-30-2012, 02:30 PM
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It does make a difference which manufacturer of CD-Rs one uses. Most of the recognized brand names source from about five manufacturers--one in Japan, one in India, and the others in Taiwan. In terms of consistency, the Japanese manufacturer is the best but uses its proprietary dye that is less stable beyond forty years, if that is important. The Taiwanese manufacturers are all about equal in quality and generally use a more environmentally stable dye. The Indian manufacturer is a close third to the Taiwanese.

However, even if the manufactured quality is near perfect, excellent recordings are only possible if one's recording drive is compatible with the design of the disc. (This is not generally a problem anymore with CD-Rs, but it remains a problem with DVD-/+R discs, particularly with 8X DL discs that are manufactured two different ways.) All discs will have errors. The best recordings have the fewest errors to begin with, and each error should only be in the lower "C1" class.

Optical discs are neither as simple as some people make them out to be or as complex as others who love to rate them explain their choices.
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:05 PM
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Well said Wilhelm! I would also think that it would be better to rip a damaged CD with EAC, then burn a disc from the corrected wav files rather than try to clone a damaged CD. My opinion...
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilhelm View Post
It does make a difference which manufacturer of CD-Rs one uses. Most of the recognized brand names source from about five manufacturers--one in Japan, one in India, and the others in Taiwan. In terms of consistency, the Japanese manufacturer is the best but uses its proprietary dye that is less stable beyond forty years, if that is important. The Taiwanese manufacturers are all about equal in quality and generally use a more environmentally stable dye. The Indian manufacturer is a close third to the Taiwanese.

However, even if the manufactured quality is near perfect, excellent recordings are only possible if one's recording drive is compatible with the design of the disc. (This is not generally a problem anymore with CD-Rs, but it remains a problem with DVD-/+R discs, particularly with 8X DL discs that are manufactured two different ways.) All discs will have errors. The best recordings have the fewest errors to begin with, and each error should only be in the lower "C1" class.

Optical discs are neither as simple as some people make them out to be or as complex as others who love to rate them explain their choices.
I bought some TDK 52x CD-R discs because the price was good & I ran out of the multi colored Imation CD-R discs. I can tell you that my setup has NOT changed as I am using the same stuff to burn them. Well I have a few players that do NOT like playing the TDK discs (I even went & tried a different brand of burner), they will skip and/or freeze up. But those same players have NO problem with the Imation discs.

Go figure.
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Old 06-01-2012, 11:07 PM
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The Indian ones are quite good actually. Many big names relabel them (Sony, Panasonic etc.).

I would use them before considering dubious Taiwanese ones.

Anyway, most CD manufacturers left for long the CD-boat (many also the DVD one) to focus on the BDR manufacture. So they left a void to be filled in by what-was-before-considered-to-be third grade mfg.

And yes, use EAC (it needs to be corectly set, otherwise ) and a good reader (Plextor 12x or LG) and keep a copy of it as a source for backuping copies for car, home etc.
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:16 PM
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Amazing!

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Originally Posted by 390FE View Post
I bought some TDK 52x CD-R discs because the price was good & I ran out of the multi colored Imation CD-R discs. I can tell you that my setup has NOT changed as I am using the same stuff to burn them. Well I have a few players that do NOT like playing the TDK discs (I even went & tried a different brand of burner), they will skip and/or freeze up. But those same players have NO problem with the Imation discs.

Go figure.
You stirred an old memory with your comments on CD-R branding. A few years ago (several at my age) a local office supply house elected to dump their inventory of Imation CDs. They were of the 16X era, and reportedly not up to snuff compared to TDK (and others) of the infamous 52X versions. I operate several burners, early production heavies, like the Carver PDR-10 (Philips), Marantz early 600 series, etc. To this day, I pat myself on the back again and again, for purchasing all the 16X media the supply house had. At 7.00 per 50 count, it was a bargin 10 years ago. To this day, my Imation inventory blows away all the 24X, 36X and 52X media for bullet proof burns. I'm sure the newer burners are designed around the blistering speeds 52X has to offer, but I'm much happier running vintage machinery using old time discs at the "slower than molasses in the winter time" 16X others turn their noses up to these days. Best to you
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