Tapeheads Tape, Audio and Music Forums
High quality analog audio tape for professionals and enthusiasts alike.

Go Back   Tapeheads Tape, Audio and Music Forums > Tape, Taping and Tape Machines > Reel To Reel

Reel To Reel All discussions pertaining to reel to reel decks. These include general usage, recording, playback, and service questions. For subjects related to tape itself, see the Open Reel subforum under this one. Obscure service subjects that don't quite fit go in the Help and Do It Yourself subforum.

Donate to Tapeheads!
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-10-2018, 06:23 PM
Lance Lawson's Avatar
Lance Lawson Lance Lawson is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,429
What if Reel To Reel Had Stayed The Major Format?

Yeah it's the middle of winter, the weather is lousy projects are on hold and MoTown hasn't made a decent record in 45 years. But I'm not going to let that stop me from posing the following question.

Supposing the digital audio revolution never happened and that the Compact Cassette never took off. Supposing the Reel To Reel machine remained the primary medium for home recording. What would the market be like now?

Would decks have become ever more complex without the need to compete with other formats?

Would it have been a consumer vs professional market where truly professional products were kept out of easy reach of the consumer?

Would there have been a leveling off of features and performance?

Would we have ended up with 30 tape manufacturers turning out a new and better tape every month? Would there have been RTR tapes marketed as "perfect for Jazz" or "perfect for Classical?"

It was sort of heading in that direction until the cassette ended the party but with only RTR would there have been mega long play tapes with modern miracle materials and 5,000 ' on a 7" reel?

Would they have come up with even faster speeds or conversely even slower speeds. With uninterrupted development and research competition perhaps there would have been audiophile audio running at 1 ips with a 7" reel able to run an entire day.

As such we ended up with a tidy collection of tapes largely in the vein of the best available at the end. But I tend to think that we would have magnificent devices sort of like comparing a 1979 family sedan with a 2018 family sedan. Both haul passengers yet the later one is the earlier version's superior in just about every way.

For better or worse we're locked into this frozen in time development stage that was still a long way from reaching it's peak.
__________________
Reel to reel:Teac A-2300SD, Realistic TR-3000, Harmon Kardon CD 291, Technics RS-B49R,Yamaha KX-1200U, TEAC W-880RX

Last edited by Lance Lawson; 02-10-2018 at 06:26 PM.
  #2  
Old 02-10-2018, 06:42 PM
kermit z's Avatar
kermit z kermit z is offline
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Denver,CO
Posts: 172
Good question. But the problem with Open reels are their complexity to the average home user. So progress would have taken it's toll IMHO regardless. Look at the progress made from the beginning of the recorded sound. Now days you only have to click on a file on your computer or your phone and you have music.
__________________
TEAC A-3300SX, TEAC A-4010S, Akai GX-265D
  #3  
Old 02-10-2018, 06:48 PM
Tinman's Avatar
Tinman Tinman is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 3,340
Well, my guess is that Reel to Reel would have achieved at the very least the same frequency response that cassette did at much slower speeds.

Meaning, 15ips sound at 3 3/4 ips. with better circuits, heads and possibly even METAL tape. I'd guess they would also have Auto Calibration, HX Pro like Studer A820, etc. Full remote... and possibly at some point an auto threading system like the big Sony Broadcast video machines had.

I think that's about it, other than miniaturization of the electronics and motors, so the decks could be thinner and lighter with the same or better performance.

Evolution, I think, but probably not THAT much further.
  #4  
Old 02-10-2018, 06:55 PM
Monkeyboy's Avatar
Monkeyboy Monkeyboy is offline
TapeHeads.Net Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 10
I would bet it would have wound up pretty much like the turntable and cartridge market today. We now have turntables and cartridges that are quite nice that would have been pants-wetting amazing when cassettes took off, and that's ignring what the best stuff is like now.

The refinements would have probably been gradual with heads being a maor beneficiary of peole's efforts. Some of them would have been subtle but real, some may well have been profound. The real problem with such a statement is without the event having actually taken place we wil probably never know. One thing is certain, record playing equipment far outshines the stuff extant when I was in high school and tape recording/playback technology would have kept pace, being spurred on by the studios and the gearheads who simply love such stuff.

I doubt we would have tapes marketed toward cassical, jazz or rock and roll afficianados since people have pretty much figured out that if something works well it works well across the board for the most part. Your stereo doesn't care what you listen to, it just cares if it presents the notes well or not.

Who knows what changes would have been made in tape configurations? I doubt tape decks would have become more and more complex, just more refined in their componenets with certain aspects of those refinements passed down from the upper teir decks to the lower teir ones with certain compromises acknowledged along the way.

I agree the format hasn't been taken to it's utmost expression yet, and it almost certainly never will be. However, when cassettes came along and digital came too reel to reel was already in an enviable position. It just got supplanted by "perfect music forever".
  #5  
Old 02-10-2018, 08:41 PM
vintagepc vintagepc is offline
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 997
On the other end of the spectrum (and somewhat tongue-on-cheek), what you would almost certainly have had is the predatory consumer practices of today - from bargain-bin decks made entirely of plastic and as likely to strip the oxide from your tape as play it... much like you see in the turntable revival. Or not to mention proprietary decks that would scan barcodes printed on the tape backcoat to ensure you're only using their own brand tape ... head lifetime counters that refuse to play once you've put so many hours or feet of tape past them...

One thing I think you'd definitely see with the advances in motor magnets, integrated circuits, microprocessors, etc. is damn-near-perfect speed and tension control of your tape... probably to a point where one could even fast-wind a tape and get a perfect pack.

And as mentioned, probably automatic self-calibration for tape bias and levels on all but the cheapest decks. Perhaps even automated self-aligning head-stacks in the real cork-sniffer decks that can auto-correct for tapes recorded slightly out of phase

Last edited by vintagepc; 02-10-2018 at 08:43 PM.
  #6  
Old 02-10-2018, 09:54 PM
Mark J's Avatar
Mark J Mark J is offline
Burning Tape
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Brandywine Valley
Posts: 2,750
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Lawson View Post

Supposing the digital audio revolution never happened
We wouldn't have computers and so much more.
__________________
10X, 10XD, C300, CD-301, K-12, K-112, K-117, MXD-D3 (x2), MZ-N707, MZ-G750, 7525, RC-9, RS-20, SX-724, TCD-330
  #7  
Old 02-11-2018, 07:50 AM
Red_OX's Avatar
Red_OX Red_OX is offline
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: East Midlands England
Posts: 3,866
Smile

But surely R2R did evolve into being implemented in a cassette small enough for ease of use in the car/office and home use for the masses...I mean it's still two reels of tape going left to right or right to left.
__________________
God bless Alan...
  #8  
Old 02-11-2018, 07:51 AM
Bob Boyer Bob Boyer is offline
Tapeheads Supporter
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 2,232
I'll play. My guesses are the the pro-sumer market for multi-track machines would have continued to grow as musicians would still want to record at home since that genie was out of the bottle. A side benefit would have been that the pro-sumer 2 track machines would have been good options as in-home decks for hobbyists able to afford them. Features and performance would have leveled off once everyone got into the multi-track home recording market.

I doubt there would be more than Scotch, Ampex, TDK, BASF, and Maxell making tape. Remember, the folks making tape today are mostly engineers who worked for those five companies. If they were still making tape for those companies, they wouldn't have need of starting a new business to feed their families.

The bigger issue - assuming no digital revolution - would have been the vertical integration that still would have inevitably happened when smaller manufacturers got swallowed up by larger entities, be they larger hi-fi manufacturers or, as in the case of Sony/Columbia/BMG/etc., the combination of software and hardware businesses into one entity. The same drive towards market domination by certain companies would have come into play as it has since the early days of digital technology, with the same negative results for consumers.

I don't see 30 manufacturers of tape decks trying to sell based on commodity pricing, if that's where you're going, Lance. Marketing and promotion of features and specs would be the selling point and the prices would still be such that only the middle class and up could think of affording a reel to reel in a home system. But that also assumes societal forces would not have changed the way we consume and listen to music anyway.

We still would not have some golden era of reel to reel recorders for everyman.
__________________
If you're starting to worry about what people think of you, perhaps it's time to go fishing.

ReVox B77, VPI HW-Jr w/Mk III platter/SME 3009/Denon DL304, Phonomena, Apple iMac, Tascam UH-7000, Exposure 2010S, LSA 1 Monitors, Nordost speaker cable/Vampire Wire connects
  #9  
Old 02-11-2018, 08:13 AM
steerpike's Avatar
steerpike steerpike is offline
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Transvaal, South Africa
Posts: 1,711
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark J View Post
We wouldn't have computers
There were analogue computers in the 1940s. The common "op-amp" is a relic of analogue computing technology - the 'op' part referring to mathematical operations that it was intended to do.
  #10  
Old 02-11-2018, 08:58 AM
Ghitulescu's Avatar
Ghitulescu Ghitulescu is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 14,771
The R2R would have had all the technologies and improvements the complementary technology, the CC, had up to the end.
__________________
It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established authorities are wrong.
  #11  
Old 02-11-2018, 12:24 PM
Lance Lawson's Avatar
Lance Lawson Lance Lawson is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Boyer View Post

I doubt there would be more than Scotch, Ampex, TDK, BASF, and Maxell making tape. Remember, the folks making tape today are mostly engineers who worked for those five companies. If they were still making tape for those companies, they wouldn't have need of starting a new business to feed their families.
It's not so much about more tape doping plants. It is whether more tape types would have been developed (real or assumed) by say 3M to compete with Maxell to compete with Ampex. There was literally dozens of cassette formulas in production at any given time when cassette ruled. I see RTR having "everyday" low grade tape to special quality to true studio and audiophile all in production and all having a market. When RTR was the only tape there were grades of tape but it never reached the frenzy that the cassette doping market did. But it likely would have had it stayed the standard of tape recording and audio dubbing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_OX View Post
But surely R2R did evolve into being implemented in a cassette small enough for ease of use in the car/office and home use for the masses...I mean it's still two reels of tape going left to right or right to left.
It is cozy to think the reel to reel lived on in the cassette however that's like saying a Union Pacific articulated Steam Engine lives on in the common subway car.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark J View Post
We wouldn't have computers and so much more.
In this digital age we tend to forget that the key to this age and the age before it was the transistor. It's the transistor that made virtually everything we associate with modern audio and electronics happen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkeyboy View Post
I would bet it would have wound up pretty much like the turntable and cartridge market today. We now have turntables and cartridges that are quite nice that would have been pants-wetting amazing when cassettes took off, and that's ignring what the best stuff is like now.


I doubt we would have tapes marketed toward cassical, jazz or rock and roll afficianados since people have pretty much figured out that if something works well it works well across the board for the most part. Your stereo doesn't care what you listen to, it just cares if it presents the notes well or not.


I agree the format hasn't been taken to it's utmost expression yet, and it almost certainly never will be. However, when cassettes came along and digital came too reel to reel was already in an enviable position. It just got supplanted by "perfect music forever".
The idea of tape specific genera is nothing new. Cassettes had "Ideal for CD", "Great for everyday", Casual boombox" etc etc. I can very easily see a super quiet RTR tape being geared to classical music where long quiet passages are the norm. Don't let the market as it was dictate what it might have been. Even today there are tapes better suited for types of recordings although not overtly sales pitched that way. The tape circus of the Cassette would likely have been as active in RTR if RTR was commanding the market the way cassette did. There were a great many tape brands in RTR albeit they were the repackaged standard offerings of the major brands. Whether or not the cassette tape circus was more marketing hype than actual progress is a matter of debate. But each new cassette bandwagon boosted sales for the first offerings. RTR retained a certain "snob factor" and the hey kids try this never really affected the way RTR was pitched. Or to put it another way. RTR and cassettes were the cousins in the old Patty Duke Show. Kathy being the stayed cousin RTR and cassette being the "our Patty loves to rock and roll a hot dog makes her loose control................" etc etc. Whgatever dignified aura RTR may have inherently possessed would have been given a pack seat in the all out competition wars of the product of the masses.

Interesting about the vinyl turntable market. Turntables are getting to resemble modern art concepts akin to Frank Lloyd Wright houses. At the end of the day the stylus is in a groove that is no more capable of delivering anything more than it did in 1979. So form is about the only way to grab attention to a functional plateau.
__________________
Reel to reel:Teac A-2300SD, Realistic TR-3000, Harmon Kardon CD 291, Technics RS-B49R,Yamaha KX-1200U, TEAC W-880RX

Last edited by Lance Lawson; 02-11-2018 at 12:39 PM.
  #12  
Old 02-11-2018, 01:01 PM
Velktron's Avatar
Velktron Velktron is offline
Dream tape never ends
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: In a small country with a funny name
Posts: 7,210
Very similar concept to the What if cassettes never happened thread.

It just couldn't happen, as pressure/demand for a portable format was high, which would inevitably be some form of miniaturized R2R, after the miniaturized records way would have been tried. The whole endless loop sidetracking could have been avoided, though.

And in the pro/prosumer market, it would soon feel the pressure from digital, even if in open reel tape form. Video and computer technologies would pressure towards adopting smaller, cartridge formats too, so the demise of open reel from all applications was just a matter of time. The basic assumption behind those threads, aka that miniaturized, cartridge-loaded tape wasn't ever invented or failed so badly that it never got seriously considered, are too unrealistic.

Last edited by Velktron; 02-11-2018 at 01:07 PM.
  #13  
Old 02-11-2018, 02:12 PM
Lance Lawson's Avatar
Lance Lawson Lance Lawson is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velktron View Post
Very similar concept to the What if cassettes never happened thread.

It just couldn't happen, as pressure/demand for a portable format was high, which would inevitably be some form of miniaturized R2R, after the miniaturized records way would have been tried. The whole endless loop sidetracking could have been avoided, though.

And in the pro/prosumer market, it would soon feel the pressure from digital, even if in open reel tape form. Video and computer technologies would pressure towards adopting smaller, cartridge formats too, so the demise of open reel from all applications was just a matter of time. The basic assumption behind those threads, aka that miniaturized, cartridge-loaded tape wasn't ever invented or failed so badly that it never got seriously considered, are too unrealistic.
OTOH RTR was quite miniaturized by the early 60's. We had little 3" battery powered machines. They were horrid for music but the worked. Early cassettes were horrid for music too. However as electronics and motors improved little RTR would have delivered Walkman like performance if not better than.

Bear in mind small meant cheap as did portable. An audiophile 3"RTR never appeared but there is no reason it couldn't have happened. Portable tape was the shoebox and later the boom box but a boombox was more like audio luggage. The Walkman was the truly first portable tape player that was successful as a product and as a device. Some cassette types only made sense in the car as in 4 and 8 track. As a home unit they lacked the general aesthetic proportions of a compact cassette and of course shoving an 8 track into the maw of a player lacked a certain grace and dignity. The cassette could be this dainty unit placed in a carrier and closed into it's playback device. The RTR of course required the skill and care to thread it up. Both had an appeal. But 4 and 8 TRACK were at best utilitarian.
__________________
Reel to reel:Teac A-2300SD, Realistic TR-3000, Harmon Kardon CD 291, Technics RS-B49R,Yamaha KX-1200U, TEAC W-880RX
  #14  
Old 02-11-2018, 02:28 PM
Ghitulescu's Avatar
Ghitulescu Ghitulescu is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Germany
Posts: 14,771
I would not say small and portable automatically means low quality or cheap (in all meanings).

I would say that portable and small were the attributes of premium. Like writing on rice grains, filigree and other, this was an art to manage this.

I draw the attention to Nagra and Stellavox (of course, not forgetting Uhers 4xxx, 5xxx and 6xxx and also the not-known-across-the-Atlantic Grundigs and Telefunkens) that outperform many full size R2R. Small and portable but also high quality and very expensive.
__________________
It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established authorities are wrong.
  #15  
Old 02-11-2018, 03:54 PM
Lance Lawson's Avatar
Lance Lawson Lance Lawson is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghitulescu View Post
I would not say small and portable automatically means low quality or cheap (in all meanings).

I would say that portable and small were the attributes of premium. Like writing on rice grains, filigree and other, this was an art to manage this.

I draw the attention to Nagra and Stellavox (of course, not forgetting Uhers 4xxx, 5xxx and 6xxx and also the not-known-across-the-Atlantic Grundigs and Telefunkens) that outperform many full size R2R. Small and portable but also high quality and very expensive.
Portable and small were not the attributes of the small machines of the the RTR age. These things were borderline toys. The came without any kind of real microphones and had all of the fidelity of a transistor radio. Invariably they were mono as well. They didn't have to be good. The portable transistor radios of the time were no better. But no cassette shoebox was any better. It was the Walkman that brought small into the consumer/audiophile community and it was expensive in it's time. However the thing that made the Walkman work was the headphone quality perfectly suited to the playback amp. Also to a certain extent a 3" RTR could make a credible recording if fitted with a good mic. Mics however in 1963 were much harder to come by on a consumer level.

It's easy to cite the cassette as the un challenged champion of small analogue audio but the cassette was not necessarily inevitable. It won the development wars so to speak. But there is nothing in the cassette format as we know it that was inherently superior to the RTR. Idiot proofing not withstanding but the idiot factor trends to rise if the system is friendly to idiots. Manually threading a tape would be taken as a matter of course. Also idiot proofing is no hedge against format extinction.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg benkson79a.jpg (11.5 KB, 6 views)
__________________
Reel to reel:Teac A-2300SD, Realistic TR-3000, Harmon Kardon CD 291, Technics RS-B49R,Yamaha KX-1200U, TEAC W-880RX
  #16  
Old 02-11-2018, 04:52 PM
Velktron's Avatar
Velktron Velktron is offline
Dream tape never ends
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: In a small country with a funny name
Posts: 7,210
R2R was simply yesteryear's technology by the time CC appeared. Too expensive and a handful to use for the average home user, kinda like learning to drive not just stick vs automatic, but daily driving a vehicle with an unsynchronized gearbox, too. Nobody would do that after the 1950s, except professional truckers and owners of pre-war vehicles.

Same thing with using CUIs on computers, vacuum tubes or steam engines. All things that today make sense only in a specialized professional, hardcore enthusiast or fantasy steampunk setting.
  #17  
Old 02-11-2018, 05:34 PM
Lance Lawson's Avatar
Lance Lawson Lance Lawson is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velktron View Post
R2R was simply yesteryear's technology by the time CC appeared. Too expensive and a handful to use for the average home user, kinda like learning to drive not just stick vs automatic, but daily driving a vehicle with an unsynchronized gearbox, too. Nobody would do that after the 1950s, except professional truckers and owners of pre-war vehicles.

Same thing with using CUIs on computers, vacuum tubes or steam engines. All things that today make sense only in a specialized professional, hardcore enthusiast or fantasy steampunk setting.
Not true it is very easy to fall into the pattern if everything that happened had to happen just as it did. The RTR remained the pillar of magnetic tape technology throughout the the cassette age performing in ways the CC could never hope to be as effective in. The truth is that RTR was far from being technology past it's prime. To say the RTR was yesterday's technology ready for the dustbin in the wake of the cassette is like saying the internal combustion engine had reached it's peak of efficiency and performance with the American cast iron V8.

By staying in development, out of demand of course, I see an RTR that while fundamentally the same as it's predecessors would have been electronically superior to it's ancestors. Hell amplifiers have gotten nearly dead silent, motor electric technology is vastly improved. A well developed (not boutique developed) RTR would have been better than anything Mara is doing by virtue of it not being a warmed over device made in another age. We get hints of what could have happened by observing what the cassette was doing. You can say what you will about BPC but almost every late model cassette with HXPRO sounded great in spite of all the plastic and lack of cabinet weight. I had a Yamaha 300 cassette deck that inside there was nothing to it. It is was one board with a dozen IEC's. it weighed nothing and yet it sounded as good as my heavy Golden Age Harman Kardon, perhaps better? All of these audio refinements and advancement would have gone into the RTR if the RTR was there to utilize them. It's great to think of having gotten in on the last wave of something and thinking that what you have could never have been made better or evolved further. However Every time I get into my car I'm happily reminded that while it has a 4 cyl engine burning gasoline that 4 cylinder engine bears almost nothing to the one's Henry Ford put in the Model T.
__________________
Reel to reel:Teac A-2300SD, Realistic TR-3000, Harmon Kardon CD 291, Technics RS-B49R,Yamaha KX-1200U, TEAC W-880RX
  #18  
Old 02-11-2018, 06:08 PM
Velktron's Avatar
Velktron Velktron is offline
Dream tape never ends
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: In a small country with a funny name
Posts: 7,210
The point is that you could get reasonable Hi-Fi performance from a much smaller format already in the mid to late 70s with room for further improvements, while R2R had peaked and was on its diminishing returns phase. No sense in going for e.g. a 50 kHz linear response (the best R2R decks did something like 30 kHz @ 15ips, with better SNR than CC too, but the resources used would be disproportionate to the improvement).

All this extra bandwidth and superior SNR meant that R2R basically allowed making decent second and third generation copies, an important attribute in a studio environment, but almost totally overkill for even the most hardcore home user, and rendered irrelevant by digital mastering and editing anyway.

If evolution of a non-digital audio format meant to provide CD-like performance continued, it would probably be based on video tape, AFM encoding and rotating heads, rather than even larger spools and faster linear speeds.
  #19  
Old 02-11-2018, 07:42 PM
Lance Lawson's Avatar
Lance Lawson Lance Lawson is online now
Serious Tapehead
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 6,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velktron View Post
The point is that you could get reasonable Hi-Fi performance from a much smaller format already in the mid to late 70s with room for further improvements, while R2R had peaked and was on its diminishing returns phase. No sense in going for e.g. a 50 kHz linear response (the best R2R decks did something like 30 kHz @ 15ips, with better SNR than CC too, but the resources used would be disproportionate to the improvement).

All this extra bandwidth and superior SNR meant that R2R basically allowed making decent second and third generation copies, an important attribute in a studio environment, but almost totally overkill for even the most hardcore home user, and rendered irrelevant by digital mastering and editing anyway.

If evolution of a non-digital audio format meant to provide CD-like performance continued, it would probably be based on video tape, AFM encoding and rotating heads, rather than even larger spools and faster linear speeds.
Never mind.
__________________
Reel to reel:Teac A-2300SD, Realistic TR-3000, Harmon Kardon CD 291, Technics RS-B49R,Yamaha KX-1200U, TEAC W-880RX
  #20  
Old 02-11-2018, 08:06 PM
Jody Thornton's Avatar
Jody Thornton Jody Thornton is offline
Just Enjoying the Music
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Richmond Hill, Ontario
Posts: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Velktron View Post
The whole endless loop sidetracking could have been avoided, though.
Uh oh - Don't let Dude111 hear your say that.

I suppose there could have been loading caddies that could extract a reel into the machine and thread it out when finished, but that would take away the appeal of open-reel.
__________________
Cheers,
Jody Thornton (Richmond Hill, Ontario)

Q: What did one 45 say to the other?
A: "Are you single"?

Last edited by Jody Thornton; 02-11-2018 at 08:15 PM.
Reply


Would you like to see your company or site here?  CONTACT US
For more Tapeheads affiliates and links, see the Links and Resources page.


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sony TC-270 Reel-to-Reel Take-up Reel Not Rotating Steverz Reel To Reel 5 03-16-2017 06:42 PM
I re-entered the open reel format Robroy Reel To Reel 21 06-06-2011 01:40 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2018, Tapeheads.Net. All rights reserved, no use of any element incorporated into this site without express written permission.