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View Full Version : Cerwin-Vegas VS-120s??? Fuse Questions


realjimjim
07-08-2010, 09:25 AM
Does anyone here own a set of these?

I just got mine in a package deal along with a set of Klipsch kg4s . . .

Yesterday I blew a fuse in one of the C-Vs . . . there are two fuses in there and they are both different ratings, is one a spare? Or does it use two fuses?

What size fuses should be in there?

I don't have a manual and a search didn't turn up anything for me.

Socal Sam
07-08-2010, 12:23 PM
Pull the fuse holder and take a look at the leads. If you they are not hooked up, you have a spare.

Warped Bezel
07-08-2010, 04:02 PM
Does anyone here own a set of these?

I just got mine in a package deal along with a set of Klipsch kg4s . . .

Yesterday I blew a fuse in one of the C-Vs . . . there are two fuses in there and they are both different ratings, is one a spare? Or does it use two fuses?

What size fuses should be in there?

I don't have a manual and a search didn't turn up anything for me. Unless somebody put a twelve amp fuse in like the one that sent my Pioneer SX-1500T to the local auction and I had to get the outputs rebuilt *headache* then if the others are the same they're either all right or all wrong...

Two things to do here...check the resistance at each speaker with all the fuses installed and working UNHOOKED from the amp.

Check the resistance at the speaker terminals on the amp without a load as well.

Actually, THREE things. Remember that with a 2-channel stereo amp running four speakers must take into consideration these things.


Mathematically/electrically the 2-channel amp is being asked to split the output into two virtually identical stereo pairs (at 1/2 the total outputted power because NO NEW POWER IS GIVEN, as in a dedicated multichannel device).
IF you use two pairs with similar characteristics and EQUAL resistance (assuming amperage/current draw is not grossly imbalanced) many amps can take this (they are in SERIES so resistance is roughly halved or a median of the two pairs working rating)
A gross imbalance between one of a pair can put your amp into protection mode or blow IT'S fuse(s).
A gross imbalance in amp output, a SHORT or excessive power can blow your SPEAKER'S fuse(s).
Running speakers with impedences below the recommendations of the amp manufacturer can and will end up damaging the amp eventually. The speaker if trying to tell you something and doing you a favor by blowing it's fuse to save your amp (and itself). These events are not isolated so check the entire chain. I had a Yamaha M-80 power amp and C-60 pre that both needed repair in a channel and I found that the M-80 would come out of protection mode for a short while if I removed the preamp. That's why I say that it could be more than the fuse and finding out will save so much hassle.
Measuring your speaker's resistance would indicate something being open or even a loose joint in the crossover, bad parts or wiring problems. It might also indicate a bad driver (woofer, tweeter, mid).

You may need to remove the woofer to check the crossover parts. This is also the time to look at the surrounds to see if they are shot or if the cone rubs. If none of this is true then slowly and carefully bring the volume up on the speaker just slightly with either bass or treble turned down to localize where a loss could be.

I have a nice set that blows it's fuses right at a certain volume but the speakers are fine. You will have to be a detective on this but you will be happier in the long run.

PS I had a few pairs (like BIC Venturi Formula Two and even Radio Shack) that required two, even three fuses, one for each driver). Doing the bass/treble off will probably tell you which one the fuse is for. That is probably even more helpful in itself.

imasoundhound
07-10-2010, 03:26 PM
just parted out a pair of vs-100's. no fuses on them. if you need spare drivers, though, you know where to look.