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Emo-Fan
05-24-2009, 07:49 AM
Anyone here use a dynamic range expander? I dusted off and deoxidized my Pioneer EX 9000. Used judiciously, it really awakens some older pre-recorded cassettes (like classical DG material) and other items.

Fast Forward
05-24-2009, 09:29 AM
Yea I use a DBX -3BX for mainly FM Broadcasts,but I find it works quite nicely for pre- recorded cassettes and some CDs

Acoustic
05-24-2009, 10:38 AM
Similar to FF I use a 3BX in my main system for FM and recorded FM.

Interestingly when I wanted to add dbx noise reduction in my bedroom system I found that many times a dbx 228... which is a 224 with a single band dynamic range expansion.... sells for less on ePray than the 224's.

Elite-ist
05-26-2009, 10:20 PM
Anyone here use a dynamic range expander? I dusted off and deoxidized my Pioneer EX 9000. Used judiciously, it really awakens some older pre-recorded cassettes (like classical DG material) and other items.

How goes it,

Previously had been using a dbx 3bx, then transplanted a dbx 11 model 128 into my current system. I also use a Pioneer SR-303 Reverb Amplifier and a new BBE 882i Sonic Maximizer, which I have the 8-track, tuner, CD players, cassette decks, R2Rs, Mini Disc, and turntable patched through to. Love the sound, and it's even more enhanced if I have the strobe light synched up.

Nando.

Emo-Fan
05-27-2009, 04:14 PM
Overused (and strangely with some Dolby-C tapes) I get unpleasant noise-pumping sounds. But as stated earlier, judiciously (that means just a little bit of expansion) otherwise lackluster-sounding recordings really come to life.

My motivation for getting it back out in the first place was that my dbx unit, intended for my TEAC 3440, doesn't work. A long while ago, I powered it up, but other than the power light, nothing worked. It had a blown fuse, so I replaced ALL the fuses and jiggled some wires and poked around and such. Then, like a Christmas tree it sprang to life. Unfortunately for me, it went down again, and I can't get it up and running again, try as I might.

But I got to thinking:
With quantegy 499 (or equivalent EMTEC tapes, since Quantegy is now gone), I get about 9 dB improved s/n ratio (higher saturation point), so using that tape, I can insert the Pioneer dynamic range expander into the recording chain and get BETTER results than the dbx. As a general rule, I don't like NR for reel-to-reel, nor is it really necessary. And the dynamic range on the TEAC is pretty good to begin with, so it's only the most demanding recordings that I'd ever really need dynamic range expansion anyway. But we're on this website to talk a lot about theory and our experiences, so I thought I'd put my two cents' worth out there. (Or as we say in German, "Ich geb' meinen Senf dazu!")

Hope someone has something to add!

Elite-ist
05-27-2009, 05:40 PM
Hi Emo-Fan,

I've only used the dbx on playback, so far. After recording with a dynamic range expander, is the recording better to be played back with the dbx defeated, or reduce the input sensitivity level with the dre engaged?

Nando.

Fairchild
05-28-2009, 04:24 AM
I have used RG range expanders, Pioneer later bought them and added them to their line, I have also used the DBX 3BX and now the DBX DS3BX which has impact restoration (adds the punch back). I have liked them all to some degee. The old RG's are nice but are prone to IC failure with the age they have on them now, the Pioneers I have used do not seem to be plagued with this IC issue. The steady work horses have been the DBX units, I have had 3 of them now with no issues.

If you record using an expander (it can also be used to compress, the recording industry does, typically a Fairchild limiter was used in the hayday) to tape I would not use it during playback, unless you used it to compress during taping then you would use it to open the recoding back up.

Jim

Elite-ist
05-28-2009, 08:17 AM
If you record using an expander (it can also be used to compress, the recording industry does, typically a Fairchild limiter was used in the hayday) to tape I would not use it during playback, unless you used it to compress during taping then you would use it to open the recoding back up.

Jim
Hi Jim,

I'm lazy, and haven't read through the instruction manual for the dbx 128, yet. Thanks for the advice. I also have a dbx model 100 "boom box" sub harmonic synthesizer, which I will later hook up with a dedicated amp and sub-woofer. My neighbours may not take too kindly to that, if I can't restrain myself in cranking it up.
Would a Pioneer RG-2 be a good addition, or just stick with the dbx? I have a few of the Pioneer silver series components, which would be complemeted by the RG-2.

Take care,

Nando.

Emo-Fan
05-28-2009, 01:15 PM
I may have expressed myself badly:

I'd record normally (4 channel) then, during the downmix to stereo, insert the dynamic range expander into the chain to record onto either CD (Yuck!) or DVD. DVD hard disc recorders can handle the added dynamic range and, if you use really good tape, no hissy s/n ratio problems. Add to that the warmth (or at least some of it anyway) of analogue! (In case that's unclear: TEAC 4-channel -- multitrack mixer--dynamic range expander--hard disc recorder.)

Anyone have any thoughts?

Scorpion8
05-28-2009, 01:52 PM
I have yet to try out my 228 dBx unit that I picked up for a song. There's always something else going on ....

Elite-ist
05-28-2009, 02:58 PM
I may have expressed myself badly:

I'd record normally (4 channel) then, during the downmix to stereo, insert the dynamic range expander into the chain to record onto either CD (Yuck!) or DVD. DVD hard disc recorders can handle the added dynamic range and, if you use really good tape, no hissy s/n ratio problems. Add to that the warmth (or at least some of it anyway) of analogue! (In case that's unclear: TEAC 4-channel -- multitrack mixer--dynamic range expander--hard disc recorder.)

Anyone have any thoughts?

Hi,

So, does your Pioneer EX-9000 have provisions for quad inputs and outputs? With the dbx 128, I would need a 2nd dbx 128, and couple the two together through the quad coupler jacks, so the compression/expansion circuits could track each other. Wouldn't it be neat not to downmix to stereo, and leave the 4-channel recording intact. Do you also have a quad receiver or demodulator for playback?

Take care,

Nando.

Emo-Fan
05-28-2009, 03:21 PM
Hi, Elite-ist,

No, I use a Peavey mixer. Up to 10 channels in, 2 out. Each to his own, but I never really got into surround sound. In a good acoustic environment with good speakers, the surround sound is natural, not coming from satelite cubes and the like. Dolby and DTS Surround sound is great for movies, but I never liked it much for music. That's just me, though; I know guys who have a separate system for music in one room and another surround system for movies in another.

The Pioneer dynamic range expander has inputs for stereo only.

Elite-ist
05-28-2009, 03:39 PM
Hi, Elite-ist,

No, I use a Peavey mixer. Up to 10 channels in, 2 out.
The Pioneer dynamic range expander has inputs for stereo only.


Sounds good,

I like that you also use a mixer to handle all your source inputs. I'm using a DJ-style pre-amp/mixer. Don't tell me you're using all 10 pairs of input jacks, presently! If not, that only gives you a fine reason to get more components.

Nando.